Viking Food Guy

Recreating the food and drink of the Viking Age (and others)

Browsing Posts published in May, 2010

My class is tomorrow, and I think I’m as prepared as I’m going to be.  The skyr, sauerkraut, bread, and beer are done.  I’ve got stuff to make more kraut for the class, as well as to cook up some salt fish with leeks.  The class handout is done, and posted here as a new […]

I’ll be teaching a class next weekend on Preserved Foods in the Viking Age, so today I did some prep cooking for the class.  I started a batch of skyr which I’ll finish up this evening, made some sauerkraut with fresh dill weed, and made up a jar of pickled eggs that should be ready […]

I spent some time this weekend rereading some articles on Scandinavian dairy products in the 16th-early 20th centuries.  While obviously outside of the Viking period, there is a lot to be gleaned that could easily be applied to recreating Viking dairy products. The first is about what the author jokingly refers to as a Swedish […]

I’m teaching a class at an upcoming event on preserved foods of the Viking age, and I’ve started doing some prep work ahead of time for the class.  I’ve made many batches of barley based flatbread in the past based on the archeological evidence from Birka*, but always before with an eye toward eating them […]

Over the weekend I started my third batch of sahti, which is essentially the folk small-beer of Finland, and what at least one author refers to as one of the oldest living beer styles.  I haven’t had a chance to try and construct the traditional mash tun made from a hollow log, so I had […]

One of the first things anyone says at every public demo we do about Viking food is “oh, lutefisk!  Gross!”.  The Vikings did not, in fact, have any lutefisk.  What they had instead was stockfish, which is unsalted cod dried hard as a board.  Much later, the Scandinavians figured out that stockfish was more easily […]

On glop

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Given the intersection of what the Vikings had to eat and what they had to cook it with (both of which we can know from the archeological record) I surmise that a great deal of what the average Viking ate on any given day boiled down to what my friend Eulalia calls “war glop”, and […]

The kind of plowing rig pictured here From Horse Plowing From Horse Plowing represents the pinnacle of Viking agricultural technology.  Such a setup, with horses (and horse collars) pulling a metal mould board plow, was just be introduced into parts of Denmark at the very end of what we traditionally think of as the Viking […]

One of my recent favorites, that I learned from Jorunn when she entered it in our Kingdom Arts & Sciences competition a few years back… Simmer leeks and dried fish in cream with a little salt (very little if the fish is salty).  She used smoked black cod, which I’ve done as well.  It’s expensive, […]

One of the real challenges of trying to reproduce Viking food is that we can’t actually know exactly what they ate because they didn’t write it down.  What we do have to go on is the archeological record, and some very sketchy literary evidence from the sagas.  What that leaves us with is “Viking possible”.  […]